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to take over the stem industry. that's the science, technology, engineering and math. she is a scientist at one of the leading biotechnology companies. she is the founder of next gene girls. this was started at the grassroots, an organization commit today empowering young women for under represented communities to see themselves in science by introducing the girls to the wonders and the many -- to wonder of the many different scienceses such as engineering, technology and math professions. this is a visionary woman i set before you and it is a privilege to be able to honor her. but a little bit about who she is. she was born in the most beautiful part of san francisco. she was reared in the most wonderful promising talented part of san francisco. and without any further ado, you guys probably guess it had. that's bayview hunters point. you got to give the lady some credit. so, mom and dad, thank you very much for raising outstanding woman. (applause) >> now, ms. jackson, she understands the roadblocks and challenges many of our young people face when it comes to growing up in a challenge
equalizer in our society. and as we talk about gender equality, gender equality in math and science is such a critical area. and i'm really pleased with such great honorees, but i'm focusing on an amazing, amazing teacher who began over 45 years ago at washington high school. and i think there's a lot of ego pride in our neighborhood. she is an amazing toeholder we are honoring for women's history month. her contribution is in the field of mathematics at washington high school, go back over 40 years. and she is always encouraging and challenging girls and young women to study advanced courses and to consider opportunities in majoring in math and science and going on to really apply their learning. but i think she's -- when i review the different comments about her from less experienced teachers and students, the words that come out are nurturing and supportive and just a really person that brings everyone together as well. one of the events that washington high does is the pie day or pi day. i know in the math department the teachers bring different types of pies. it is an atmospher
in which science and scientists played a central and vital role. the manhattan project, the thousands of physicists and other scientists who developed the atomic bomb was the most dramatic illustration of this, i think probably today almost as well known were the thousands of mathematicians and other sign b terrific work withers in england and washington, d.c. who broke the german e anything ma, cipher and other access codes. the very small group of parish parish -- british and american scientists who really turned the tide in the battle against the u-boats are not so nearly well known at all. but their contribution was, i think, every bit as vital not only in winning one of the most crucial battles in the war against nazi germany, but also for its lasting consequences in revolutionizing the very way military commanders think about war. for that matter, revolution eyeing the way quantitative an access could be apply today a host of practical problems in the business world through the new science patrick plaqueet and his -- blacket and his scientists created during the war, operational
-income communities. there is also a gender divide as well in math and sciences and we need our champions like gail [speaker not understood] to continue their work. and i just wanted to honor you for your over 40 years at washington high school. so, thank you so much and can we have a hand for ms. barrett. thank you. (applause) >> thank you very much, supervisor mar, for this great honor. and i thank dennis kelly and president of the usf and linda mag for attending and nominating me. ~ plaque i do want to thank last but not least my husband who is here who has put up with my an ticks for the last, i hate to say 40 years, but it has been 40 years. it's a job i really, really like doing and no day is ever the same. and every day presents new challenges and i embrace these. i just want to say i looked at many of these fine women who preceded me, and i would suspect hopefully they took math in high school and did not drop out. it's very important and it's [speaker not understood] filter for getting into the sciences. if you can't get through the filter called calculus, you get nowhere. and we really en
if a big one suddenly heads our way, pray. is a lack of investment in science in space putting civilization at risk? the delightful discovery. the sweet realization that you have a moment all to yourself. well, almost. splenda® no calorie sweetener. splenda® makes the moment yours™. splenda® no calorie sweetener. great first gig! let's go! party! awwwww... arigato! we are outta here! party...... finding you the perfect place, every step of the way. hotels.com i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. waiting for your wrinkle cream to work? neutrogen
is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california on a leave of absence fro
find the answer in science, it leads to more questions. that is part of the fun. there are two aspects that are extremely strange, one is the power specter. it is as if you were listening to music and there was and i don't and the song. that is something that we see in the distribution of the spots on the cosmic mac background. and there is an even more i the thing, which is it seems to be tilted sort of in the plane, as if you were on a large ship and decided to leave your head. it is very odd. >> what does all of that mean? does it mean that the findings you are disputing ord is reorganizing how we think about the universe? >> it is probably reorganizing the thinking. this is a big discovery and science because we scientists like to put out theories. dairies are the best explanations of the data we have. -- theories are the best explanations of the data we have, but when we get new data, it means new theories. >> does it matter, we are talking 14 billion years, 15 billion, does it matter that it happened before we thought it happened, the big bang? >> let me make an analogy. suppose
through imagination, celebrating women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. >> i want to welcome all of you to this very full house and this wonderful celebration for women's history month to recognize the efforts of women in our great city and county of san francisco. women's history month is a time to appreciate the contributions of our women leaders in our communities who have been courageous in proving the quality of life for all san franciscans. since 1996, the san francisco commission and the department on the status of women ~ has recognized the vital work and contributions of women throughout our community through this program, and i would like to invite dr. emilie morasi who is the executive director of that agency to say a few words about the history of this event. >> thank you very much, president chiu. i am joined today by commissioner kay [speaker not understood]. i'd like to ask her to come on up. she's very familiar with these chambers, having served as clerk for many, many years. and if there are any other commissioners who joined us, please come on up.
their children's health. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler has more. >> reporter: parents may think they are doing the right thing but doctors say the growing problems of diabetes may be caused by infant diets. >> reporter: he gets only breast milk. but a new study found 40% of babies under 40 months are getting solid food. >> mashing up fruit with rice cereal. >> sometimes you like them to have solid foods because they sleep better. [ laughter ] >> under 4 months we need to make it clear that has been shown to be related to higher risks of asthma. >> diabetes. each baby is unique but the ability to digest develops slowly. they recommend solid food only after six months. but 93% of babies by then are already eating solids, most with doctor approval. >> maybe give them cereal to start out with. >> reporter: he recommended daily cereal but the parents say they will wait. reporting live, health and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> once it is authenticated a work out could be a new world record. [ music playing ] that is a lot of hula hoops. the listing is for the mos
's national laboratories. it was titled, the sequester is going to devastate u.s. science research for decades. they said this drop in funding will force to us cancel all new programs and research initiatives, probably for at least two years. is that going to put a damper on our future prospects? >> if the sequester holds in its current form for the ten years that it is supposed to, then yes, the answer is there will definitely be horrible consequences. i think before we go to the bad news, you need to give a little context. the good news is that america has been investing in research and development. it has been investing in science and technology at a very high rate. in 2009, thanks partly to the stimulus, the u.s. investment matched the previous high at the space race at 2.9 of gdp. that amount of money being poured into public and private research. so we've come down a little because of the budget cuts already put in place and we've come down much more because of the sequester. that speaks exactly to what i was argue ewing in my special report. the federal government tends to either not re
the science and business of addictive food with, author michael moss, coming up next. ♪ i'm your venus [ female announcer ] what does beauty feel like? find out with venus embrace. every five-bladed stroke gives you 360 degrees of smooth for goddess skin you can feel and feel. ♪ i'm your venus only from venus embrace. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. go. ♪ keep on going in this direction. take this bridge over here. there it is! [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. [ laughter ] [ male announcer ] earn points with the citi thankyou card and redeem them for just about anything. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. ♪ the middle of this special mom
in computer science. he said, come look at my computer lab, i went to his computer lab and he had the big machine and it looked impressive to me. i had a mac at home. he said let me show you something, it's the first time i saw the worldwide web. it showed exhibit and had picture and text. as far as i knew the internet was text. i said, james, if you can have text on the computer why can't we have a newspaper on the web? i said that and he said, well, maybe we should something like that? one thing lead to another and the times started a task force of online. they put out the first website in january '96, i became the first editor of the website. so i changed completely from the traditional journalist to a website journalist, it was quite an education for me. >> do you want know keep going and going? tell me. let me tell you a little bit about the conclusion. i shouldn't tell you too much. i want do you buy the book. [laughter] this is what happened. to have a book like this, you expect that you're going have a know where it comes out. the reporters at the time told me we were going come o
of the subcommittee on commerce, justice, and science. thanks for being here. i want to first get a sense of where we are in the investigation. the fbi. how soon do you expect it will be revealing the contents? he tried to leave the kutcher for china. >> he's in prison. he's in jail. they should be within the next couple of days. lou: we listen to fbi director muller talk about how serious the problem has become. i have a strange feeling that if we did not have your voice on this right now there would not be a discussion of what is happening in nasa. various science centers, our national laboratories, and the full breadth of what is the chinese spying efforts of all sorts in this country, not just simply cyber spying, but 3500 from companies. this is a major threat against this country. >> it is a major threat. every major american company has been hit with a cyber attack. everyone. i have seen the list. the university's, foundations, major law firms. they hit my area. they took everything off of my computer a few years ago. people have been reluctant to speak out about it. what is so shocking and ma
believe republicans are anti-immigrant. >> our message was weak. >> anti-woman. anti-science. >> we weren't inclusive. >> anti-gay. anti-worker. >> there's a long list of them. >> the list goes on and on and on. >> buck up or stay in the truck. buck up and run. >> i'd say, if i did run for office and win, i'd serve out my term. >> if standing for liberty and standing for the constitution makes you a wackobird, chen count me a proud wackobird. >> cpac had to cut back on its speakers this year by 300 pounds. >> barack obama, you lied. >> i think it's about dignity and respect. >> so this go-round, he's got the rifle, i've got the rack. >>> we begin with the republican party facing a serious case of the mondays. after a weekend carouse iing at cpac, no doubt downing a few in honor of st. patrick, today came the reckoning with the revelation of their own autopsy on what went badly wrong in 2012. this morning, it fell to rnc chair, reince priebus to give his party an uncompromising look in the rearview mirror. >> our message was weak. our ground game was insufficient. we weren't inclusive. we
be minimized. this senate commerce, science and transportation subcommittee hearing is an hour 15 minutes. >> [inaudible] >> good morning. we are delighted to have this meeting in the new congress of our science and space subcommittee. nasa and the space programs have been in the news a lot in the past year. some really impressive feats, and we're going to be talking about some of those from rover on mars to the birthing of the spacex capsule at the international space station. i am delighted to have my colleague, senator chris in texas, as our ranking member. -- senator chris. it seems like texas and florida have some interest in the space program. and i'm looking forward to his leadership and i would ask for his opening statement. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. let me echo those sentiments and say how much i'm looking forward to working with you on this subcommittee. spaceflight and our capacity to maintain world leading advantage in spaceflight is a critical priority for the nation. and certainly a critical priority both for the state of texas and the state of florida, and so i am e
tv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very well documented problems which we have failed as a profession to fix. and so i think we need the help more than anything else of the public. it's sort of a -- mass they are people like nerds and lawyers and d
for more. host: said arikat, there has been discussion as to what the chemical weapons were used in science syria. in a news over the last 48 hours inside syria. any news over the last 48 hours? guest: the state department has no evidence to show that the syrian government or the opposition -- there have been opposition -- accusations on both sides about using chemical weapons. there has been no evidence of that. the united nations is leading an effort to determine whether chemical weapons have been used. there are all kinds of technical things involved. they need to conduct these experts to determine if it is by a examination or looking at injuries to determine whether chemical weapons have been used. we have been told by people in the intelligence community the for the regime to use chemical weapons, there are logistical problems. thus far, there has been no evidence. host: a follow-up from one of our viewers. it is in the rebels' interest to use chemical weapons. there is no upside for president assad to do it. this headline from the baltimore sun. the president urging a palestinian stat
incubator, and make room for the next big idea-- like enbio, a materials science company, also launched from university college dublin. the startup is pioneering new treatments for metals that won a contract for the heatshields on the european space agency's orbiter heading to the sun in the coming years. karl flannery, who started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing p
into affect next wednesday that. is fast. >> there is no doubt the science behind embryonic stem cell research can be complex so now, california institute for reagain ra tiff medicine is getting researchers to rethink the way they communicate. >> the taxpayer funded institute so what does she do? we'll let her explain it. >> i fund stem cell research cell research. and finding an interesting discovery in a laboratory model trying to help them move that into clinics to be studied in humans. >> pretty clear so why the elevator? >> i'm going to go ahead and explain the story. >> directors launched a campaign called elevator pitch challenge to teach cutting edge researchers how to explain works to a stranger in the length of a ride and... make them care bit. >> peoples eyes glaze over when you talk about research? >> directors scored videos on brevity, clarity and create activity. some researchers were born performers. >> 120,000 people a year are dying of chronic lung disease we zront any therapies. >> well, some looked they'd be more comfortable in front of a mike zone z those whose mastery of c
and science. >> the chair of the ftc announces he's leaving his post. >> emily chang joins us now with this afternoon's after the bell report. emily? >> good afternoon, carolyn carey. communications commission chairman says he will resign incoming week nose word on who his successor might be and announced news today focusing on broad band working to improve lives of americans his departure will leave two vacancies on the commission. sap's co-ceo got a 41% increase in compensation last year the package totalled $11 million. and about half is scheduled to pay hout in 2016. shares rose 50% last year. marin software shares soared in early trading and ended up around 16% stocks rising today on better than expected earnings. your bloomberg silicon valley index higher on shares of apple and mooul mooul and samsung reportedly in talks to sell a dutch sib sid yairy to amazon. the subsidiary makes e reader display technology. the market has been shrinking as more people turn to tablets. have a wonderful weekend. >> the devil's slide tunnels are finally opening and businesses are celebrating
. it is not rocket science. it is simple stuff. this is something that -- you talk to manufacturing, manufacturers and it is the number one issue you here. there's a frustration, because the manufacturing community knows we are on the verge of michigan, on the verge of doing something special, but in order to get there, skilled workforce and the innovative work force, productive work force is going to meet the short-term challenges and put their as we think about this, the skills issue is about a short- term fit to a critical problem. but then it is about long-term solutions. if we can get to a place where we have right, innovative, productive, well-trained and educated people in the workforce, that will set manufacturing to continue to compete and grow. this all links together. hopefulething we are we will see move in the coming weeks and months in the senate. we will continue to work with you and try to be a supportive as we can. i look forward to the discussion. >> thank you. >> it is great to be here with you, senator. as i think about the skills gap , i think about science, technology, and ge
the same science that brought us dolly the cloned sheep has advanced to the point where scientists might be able to bring them back. the extinction is national geographic story. >> maybe it got frozen somehow, you can use that to create an embryo, you can implant it in a living animal, that egg will become an animal. >> don't expect t-rex with the museum of natural history. >> you have to divide it into stone cold dead, which is what dinosaurs are, they're fossils, and then things that went recently extinct that you may have specimen of what amounts to be the carcass of the animal. >> the extinction happened, in 2003, a team of french scientists brought back a type of mountain goat. the last one died in 1990, but scientists preserved cells and were able to genetically engineer it and it lived ten minutes before dying. while it may be cool to have them back, there are a number of ethical issues. the animal habitat may no longer exist. what happens in this new world of genetics where people pick and choose genetic quality. >> the technology is the same with a passenger pigeon or virus. wha
what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity, which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we should ban most things. i do think there are certain times we should infringe on your freedom, and that is, for example, if you're drinking, we shouldn't let you drive, because you'll kill somebody else. if you are carrying a gun, we shouldn't let you on an airplane. there's a lot of things that we do -- if there's asbestos in the classroom we should remove the kids from the classroom until you clean the air, but in terms of smoking, if you want to smoke, i protect your right to dot that. if you want to own a gun, i certainly think it's constitutionally protected. you certainly have a right
of desperation. we pray for those with illnesses that medical science cannot cure. we pray for those in whom hate has become malignant and those in whom hope has died. bless our fair city and its leadership. bless our governor, and give strength to our president barack obama. this is our prayer in jesus' name, amen. >>> amen. (applause) >> lift every voice and sing till earth and heaven ring, ring with the harmonies of liberty. let our rejoicing rise high as the listening skies. let it resound loud as the rolling sea. sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us. sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us. facing the rising sun of our new day begun, let us march on till victory is won. stony the road we trod, bitter the chasening rod, felt in the day when hope unborn had died. yet with a steady beat has not our weary feet come to the place that our father's died. we have come over the way that with tears has been watered. we have come treading the path of the blood of the slaughtered. out of the gloomy past, till we now stand at last, with a white gleam of our
the red carpet" from the discovery science center in orange county. i'm rachel smith. we're here to check out this amazing exhibit on indiana jones and the adventures of archeologist. there are costumes, props and so much more from all four indy movies. while we take a look around, let's talk some new movies. otrc's karl schmid is on the red carpet for "olympus has fallen." >> rachel, this hollywood red carpet has been in serious lockdown tonight for the premiere of gerard butler and morgan freeman's latest film "olympus has fallen," all about the white house being taken down by terrorists. and with real secret service agents sweeping the carpet before the stars arrived, was gerard worried about how it was received? >> i've got to be honest, i was nervous. they loved it! they laughed at the right bits, they gapsed, they applauded. they went crazy for it. >> the movie deals with terrorism, so how did the stars make sure the sensitive subject matter was handled carefully but still entertained? >> the unseen heroes they make us safe he have single day. >> you don't give away too many secrets
capita, per student with the rank and 25 otas 37 default nation's, 17 in science and 14 and reading? >> when i share those statistics with people they cringe a little bit. we are 25th in math and some of the countries ahead of us are hon mariana slovenia. i think as americans we don't expect to be behind slovenia or hungary. when i started years ago someone showed me a scatter plot of all of the developed nations in the world and on the one access it was academic achievement levels of the students and on the other access was the amount of money that country spends per child on their public education system. we were in the cauldrons that you do not want to be which is spending a lot of money and have poor results and the only other thing that was in the squadron plus luxembourg. i think the problem with this notion is that for decades, people have been pushing this idea that what we need in order to fix a system is more money, more money. but when i got to d.c. it wasn't the case they were more than any of our jurisdiction and the entire nation. in new york and new jersey they're spe
. >> plus the science behind nature very own alarm [ man ] it's big. fast. safe. quickly reconnects families. same with aladdin. brings families back together. aladdin became the biggest in bail by treating people right. no one has lower prices, is faster or more professional than aladdin. we'll get you through it. aladdin bail bonds. bigger because we're better. barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ask. >> this is 7 news. >> we of think of the urged interest need for food at bay area food bank around the holiday. but urgent need for help from the alameda county have had bank tonight. they will be completely out of donations bit end of this week. many of the shelves empty at the berkeley food pantry that relies heavily on the county food bank for did nation. demand for food expected to rise durin
that i only heard in eighth grade science class, the last science class i had, the chart has gone parabolic. did i ever claim to work at the jet propulsion lab? what it meant was that stocks had started to go up in pretty much a very steep slope. this is a parabola. so steep that the angle is getting a little dangerous if you're all the way up here, right? here it's still pretty good and you get there and it's a nice place to plunge, right? and you got to wait so that time would pass and it wouldn't be such a steep parabola. she wasn't saying that we were going to crash at all. she wasn't saying the companies weren't any good. she was simply stating that it leaves little room for error particularly when you're in the straight-up portion of the parabola. it's plenty of them as this list of parabolic stocks that i wrote down shows. this is incredible. i know. i hadn't really had this many stocks in parabola motion and they've risen the highest and the hardest and the ones taking the cake are the insurers and the banks, some of the transports. those insurers and bank stocks were stro
government spending. 2.5 trillion more, on, quote, job creation. another 2.2 trillion on things like science, energy, the environment and education. also the cpc does not want to cut entitlements. and, wants to give unemployed americans 99 weeks of cash compensation. nearly two years. the question is what does president obama think of the congressional progressive caucus? my opinion, he likes it i don't think the president believes that crew is fanatical because they want what he wants. by the way, the far left kooks do want to cut one thing, defense spending. they want to bring that back down to 2006 level. somewhere in iran is cheering. there comes a point when americans are going to have to decide what country, what kind of country they want. even taking half of what affluent americans earn, feds couldn't possibly afford what the far left wants to provide. so we would eventually become greece or cyprus if the u.s. dollar collapses and people stop lending us money. some conservatives believe that's exactly what the far left wants. a collapse of the entire capitalistic system. some on the r
. that is why we are successful on the one amendment on political science. >> greta: did any -- >> everything that we are doing is totally out of control because nobody is watching the american taxpayer's dollar. >> greta: there is something fundamental. not they disagree but they don't want you to be successful on this amendment? >> no. it's because all these programs have constituents, they may not agree but they want the money spent because somebody is going to call up, why didn't i get my granted? or why didn't we get to travel here? we're cowards when it comes to saying no which is what every family has to say when they have limited budget. they can't do the lower priority things. let get rid of low priority things and let's do some things that the spring break guys and people coming to washington ought to not to have sacrifice over. >> greta: and day long hammer for $640,000. another six or seven weeks of tours. >> coming up, brace yourself. we finally have some agreement between republican and democratic lawmakers on healthcare. we have bipartisanship. are you happy? well, you probably
shows and science fiction. we are talking about the bionic eye. but what was once fiction is now fact. we are going to talk to the doctor giving sight to the blind with his unbelievable cutting-edge technology. we're here! we're going to the park! [ gina ] oh hey, dan! i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's gointo want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. >>> you may recalled '70s television series
a big new university called the king abdullah university of science and technology, which not only makes a saudi men and women, but mixes them with infidel men and women from all over the world. and when one of the 20 senior religious scholars was asked about the appropriateness of this on tv, he said it's wrong. and the king fired him because the king appoints these 20 people, and not surprisingly, many of the other senior men began to discover that the prophet had had his hair washed by women, and other things that made this okay. so people see this, if you will, double standard, and it has undermined it, the credibility of the religious establishment. obviously, with the deeply religious but also with those who don't mind the mixing at all, but just think it's, if they can can get the religious to approve this, why can't they make them approve more things like women driving or whatever. the second pillar of stability in the kingdom is obviously the oil wealth that buys them at least acquiescence, if not loyalty anymore, for the government and royal family. 90% of the treasury in saudi
believe in science. you often hear the left lecture on science. we are on the side of science. anybody who ignores the obvious point that if you expend more energy than you bring in, you die, whether a business, person, or country. the person who ignores that is against science. in the long run, a country that spends more than it raises cannot continue. it is an existential threat to our country. that was established by economist after economist. common sense confirms it. the federal debt, there's a bigger problem. >> let me quote dick cheney, who said ronald reagan taught us that deficits do not matter. dick cheney was wrong. he was wrong then and now. of course deficits matter, but any one of you who supported the bush plans has no right to speak. i helped bill clinton balance the budget and build a surplus. why? because we had good economic times. in good economic times, you pay down the deficit, but reagan and bush did not, and in bad you have to stimulate in the near term, as thank god president obama is doing. we democrats will balance the budget once again. >> paul, which is more im
bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> on capitol hill today the man who runs nasa was asked, what could be done if a large meteor were headed for new york city? his answer? pray. cnn's chris lawrence has more on today's hearings. pretty scary stuff going on, chris. >> you said it, wolf. the only reason people aren't scared out of their minds is the fact that it's so rare for one of these big rocks to hit the earth. but look. there are 10,000 to 20,000 asteroids out there big enough to devastate a continent and only 10% have been detected. russians saw a flash of light and heard the sonic boom. the meteor exploded with the force of a nuclear bomb. it did $30 million in damage and injured thousands. and no one saw it coming. >> we were fortunate that the events of last month were simply an interesting coincidence rather than a catastrophe. >> reporter: the nation's top science officials were called before congress tuesday to explain what they're doing to detect similar threats from space. >> objects as large
to life? scientists work to revive extinct animals. this isn't science fiction, it's real. >>> i'm brianna keilar. >> and i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> the obama is standing with israel in a dangerous time in the region. >> his most urgent warning in syria, vowing that the assad regime will be held accountable if it has in fact used chemical weapons as the rebels claim. >> plet's go to jerusalem first with jessica. a very powerful meeting today. very interesting between the president and the prime minister. >> wolf, that's right. president obama here in jerusalem for the first overseas trip of his second term. a visit which in symbolism already president obama is emphasizing the u.s.'s commitment to ensuring israel's security and correcting any past sleights, real or perceived. president obama and prime minister netanyahu together in israel. they were acting like long-lost friends, joking, getting casual, complimenting each other's children while taking a little dig. >> they are very good looking young men who clearly got their
for visibly clearer skin in as little as 12 hours. yeah, it's fast. clearasil, the science of clear skin. [clucking]. everyone wants to be the cadbury bunny. cause only he brings delicious cadbury crÈme eggs, while others may keep trying. nobunny knows easter better than cadbury! can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections tuberculosis lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores have had hepatitis b have been treate
the country since 2009. they also say north korea is pouring money into science and technology. >>> the city of san jose is expected to approve a $7 million incentive for samsung to improve its company. it would replace existing offices with a more modern facility. right now the building offers 200,000 square feet of space but the company wants to expand it to 680,000 by building two ten story towers which would employ at least 10,000 people. >>> lowe's is being accused of december crimination. the chronicle is now reporting that six current and former employees have filed a lawsuit in superior court. they say lowe's hired minority employees to comply with an agreement a-- with the lowe's to be built. >>> the college says the boost is meant to help meet the demand for specific classes. more than 980 classes will be offered. the majority being english, math, and science courses. enrollment management was one area of criticism. a final decision on the schools accreditation could be made in june. >>> the golden state warriors are inching closer to a playoff spot. last night they played the firs
pores for visibly clearer skin in as little as 12 hours. yeah, it's fast. clearasil, the science of clear skin. (vo) current tv gets the converstion started next. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. >> you are. >> the troops love me. the sweatshirt is nice and all but i could use a golden lasso. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "bill press show," live on your radio, and current tv. >> bill: here we go 12 minutes before the top of the hour. the "full court press" on abmonday morning, march 18th. well, three months now since the december 14th massacre at sandy hook elementary school but for hedge funds and financial firms on wall street it has been business as usual. bill has made this a key issue of his. he joins us again on our news line this morning. bill also a candidate for mayor of new york city. good morning. >> hey bill it is a good to be back. >> bill: thanks for joining us again. i know you put out the word for investors to drop these gun manufacturers, and they are doing just the opposite right? >> most of them are. but we have seen a couple of companies go the other w
kids' education, science and research. they also cut medicaid which affects a lot of those seniors on medicare, about 20% of those seniors are also on medicaid. but it's at the end of that 10-year window that our republican colleagues then move to their voucher plan, premium support, i don't care what you call it. the only way you're going to achieve any savings compared to the baseline numbers, c.b.o. baseline that the chairman showed you, the only way you're going to do it is if you're capping the amount you're going to get so that seniors have to eat the costs and take the risks of rising health care. now, there's a better way to address that issue and that is the way we approach it in our budget and that is to build on the kind of reforms that we made in the affordable care act, in obamacare, which have helped and contributed to reducing the rapid rise in per capita health care costs and which as i pointed out earlier our republican colleagues included in their own budget. so, yes, we have to deal with these drivers of costs, including health care. but the way we propose to do
-intellectual, ain't science and uncurious. despite successes of right wing broadcasters, like glenn beck and hannity, and despite the success of populist-ish governors like scott walker and bobby jindal and despite the effectiveness of the tea party in corralling conservatism in a grassroots cause, the movement has been successfully demonized by liberals as plutocratic, corporatist, anti-other and anti-poor. i believe both are unfair characterizations. if politics is perception, then conservatism is failing on both fronts. the good news is the job of revitalizing both the movement's hitch history of intellectualism and every man tradition has two very capable applicants. the bad news is, they will need to work together. rand paul and marco rubio are often pitted against one another competes for influence and authority, at times they seem to encourage this and may, in fact, end up competing in 2016. but their differences now and until then should be exploited in productive ways for the party that addressed those two deficiencies. paul's ayn randian highly intellectualized conservatism is informed by
, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is always pointed at al qaeda and al qaeda-linked groups. because they view the attacks to have the fingerprints of that organization. it was extremely coordinated attack as you saw, more than 20 bombs, many car bombs and then for good measure they threw in some suicide bombers as well as sticky bombs on the bottoms of buses. most shi'a target and security targets. that sits in to what al qaeda is doing, try to destabilize the country by showing people its security forces can't protect them and trying to stir up the sectarian war that this country has recently emerged from. if. >> woodruff: how unusual is it to have so many attacks on the same day? >> it was a bad day, that is certainly indisputable. i was at a university today talking to university students and they were holding a party because they were graduating. you can see the smo
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